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5,000 Acres of Cotton Could be Planted Within Four Years

first_imgRelatedJamaica to Achieve Self-Sufficiency in Irish Potato Production This Year Story HighlightsThe Jamaica Agricultural Development Foundation (JADF) is actively pursuing the revitalisation of the West Indian Sea Island Cotton (WISIC) industry, with plans to have 5,000 acres of cotton under production within the next four years. Chief Executive Officer of the JADF, Vitus Evans, said the Foundation is expecting that the acreage for the 2015/16 crop will increase from the current 300 acres to approximately 800 acres at the end of that year. Sea Island Cotton is the world’s best quality cotton based on its fibre length, silk-like quality, fineness and texture. There is a high demand internationally with buyers from Switzerland, Japan, the United States, Italy and the United Kingdom. 5,000 Acres of Cotton Could be Planted Within Four YearsJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay RelatedExpansion in Agro Parks Advertisements 5,000 Acres of Cotton Could be Planted Within Four Years AgricultureJanuary 28, 2015Written by: Athaliah Baker FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail RelatedAgriculture Ministry Targets Banana Export Trade The Jamaica Agricultural Development Foundation (JADF) is actively pursuing the revitalisation of the West Indian Sea Island Cotton (WISIC) industry, with plans to have 5,000 acres of cotton under production within the next four years.Chief Executive Officer of the JADF, Vitus Evans, said the Foundation is expecting that the acreage for the 2015/16 crop will increase from the current 300 acres to approximately 800 acres at the end of that year.Mr. Evans was speaking on January 27, at the handing over of farming equipment to the JADF, at the Jamaica Exporters’ Association (JEA), on Winchester Road in Kingston.The items, which include a high crop tractor, a boom sprayer and an inter row cultivator, were procured at a cost of $11 million with funding from the Japanese Government, under its Grant Assistance for Grassroots Human Security Project.Mr. Evans said the equipment, which was procured almost a year ago, has enabled the JADF to put into cultivation 300 acres of cotton, including 130 acres in St. Mary and 170 acres in Old Harbour, St. Catherine.“There’s also been major savings in transportation costs, as we’re now able to have one set of equipment in St. Mary and another in Old Habour, thus avoiding having to transport the equipment from parish to parish as we had to do in the past,” he pointed out.Meanwhile, Minister of Agriculture, Labour and Social Security, Hon. Derrick Kellier, said the Government is in full support of the JADF’s vision.“An industry which is capable of creating 15,000 new jobs and generating almost $1 billion in foreign exchange earnings must be given all the support necessary,” he emphasised.Mr. Kellier noted that WISIC presents an immense opportunity for Jamaica to increase its foreign exchange earnings and thereby positively impact the economy.He further argued that WISIC, due to its superior quality, is one of the crops which gives the region its distinct competitive edge.“WISIC is a crop for which there exists an established export market, which is unsatisfied. I understand that there is hardly any competition from other countries. It is not a product that can be easily spoilt, it fetches a high price, and it is ideal for value addition,” he noted.In the meantime, Mr. Evans said the JADF is in discussion with Caribbean Broilers (CB) for a possible expansion of the sector in Jamaica.“Caribbean Broilers planted an experimental plot this year of about two acres and is now in the process of harvesting. They are extremely happy about the results they have gotten so far,” he added.Mr. Evans said the JADF is particularly interested in the ‘mother farm concept’, which Caribbean Broilers presently practises with their chicken farmers. “If that model is adopted, we could see CB directly involved in cultivating a certain acreage on its own farm to ensure critical mass, while supporting independent farmers to grow on contract,” he noted.“We believe this will be an ideal model and such involvement by CB would be in keeping with JADF’s concept of identifying new crops and new technologies in agriculture, doing the developmental work and have the private sector for the commercialisation,” Mr. Evans said.For his part, Japanese Ambassador to Jamaica, His Excellency Yasuo Tasake, welcomed the partnership and highlighted the superior quality of WISIC. He also cited the high demand in Japan for this type of cotton.Sea Island Cotton is the world’s best quality cotton based on its fibre length, silk-like quality, fineness and texture. There is a high demand internationally with buyers from Switzerland, Japan, the United States, Italy and the United Kingdom. Photo: JIS PhotographerMinister of Agriculture, Labour and Social Security, Hon. Derrick Kellier (right), along with Japanese Ambassador to Jamaica, His Excellency Yasuo Tasake (left), and Chief Executive Officer of the Jamaica Agricultural Development Foundation (JADF), Vitus Evans, view photos of farming equipment donated by the Japanese Government to the West Indian Sea Island Cotton (WISIC) industry. The equipment, valued at $11 million, was officially handed over at a ceremony at the Jamaica Exporters’ Association (JEA) on Winchester Road, in Kingston, on January 27.last_img read more

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Lynk claims satellite connectivity milestone

first_img Previous ArticlePaytm banking arm inks Visa dealNext ArticleIndia court blocks AGR reassessment Lockheed Martin, Omnispace target satellite 5G Related Home Lynk claims satellite connectivity milestone Author Diana Goovaerts Diana is Mobile World Live’s US Editor, reporting on infrastructure and spectrum rollouts, regulatory issues, and other carrier news from the US market. Diana came to GSMA from her former role as Editor of Wireless Week and CED Magazine, digital-only… Read more satellite OneWeb, SoftBank Corp plot Japan satellite move AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 18 MAR 2020 Tags OneWeb backing soars with $550M boost from Eutelsat Satellite connectivity start-up Lynk Global hailed a breakthrough in its quest to use space-based systems for mobile broadband, revealing it successfully sent a text message from a satellite to an unmodified mobile phone.Video of the test shows engineers receiving an emergency alert message on what appears to be an Android phone. The company, formerly named UbiquitiLink, claimed the exchange was the first of its kind using a common handset rather than a specialised device.In a statement, the company said it conducted the first test on 24 February, repeating it multiple times since.Lynk Global co-founder and VP of technology Tyghe Speidel said the achievement represents “a critical verification” of its radio access technology, which was built to compensate for the effects of placing a cell tower in orbit, a use case he noted “mobile standards were not designed for”.Progress comes as the company presses ahead with plans to deploy a network of LEO satellites capable of delivering commercial mobile service.It noted in a press release it launched a fourth satellite as part of Space Exploration Technologies’ (SpaceX) CRS-20 mission earlier this month, and plans to expand testing in the coming months. Lynk Global CEO Charles Miller added it is working with nearly 30 mobile network operators to launch a commercial product by the end of 2020.Miller previously told Mobile World Live its aim is to provide a service capable of offering affordable connectivity to “the last 2.5 billion people on earth who don’t have a phone”. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Backlast_img read more

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Alison Luff on the ‘Imperfect Nature’ of Waitress & Writing a Musical with Her Husband

first_img Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently behind liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 1xPlayback RateChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 5, 2020 Alison Luff View Comments Alison Luff has been learning all about sugar, butter and flour since she joined Waitress on Broadway, leading the show as Jenna Hunterson. Luff is the newest addition to the incredible group of women who have stepped into Jenna’s shoes and she’s loving every minute of it. “I find it a little trickier to replace in a show because you want to honor the people who have done it before you,” Luff said in a recent interview on Broadway.com’s #LiveAtFive. “I think I really started to own myself and my career when I realized I can’t do what they do better. I need to figure out what I do best and what I can offer that no one else can. [Jenna] was a dream role of mine back when I saw [Waitress] in November 2016. The first five minutes of watching it I had tears in my eyes, I turned to my husband and said, ‘I have to do this.’ I think about that almost every night when that curtain goes up. I like the imperfect nature of the story. It’s hard to make an affair a love story and make people root for it. I really love doing it.”Now appearing alongside Luff are YouTube stars Colleen Ballinger and Todrick Hall, whose fans have given Luff even more joy. “Colleen and Todrick have brought in some really beautiful fans,” she said. “I think one of my favorite things is going to the stage door every night and hearing, ‘This is my first Broadway show.’ We all remember our first Broadway show. Their fans are so kind and sweet and I think that’s a testament to them. They’re very kind people who spend so much time with their fans and are open with them, it makes a difference.”center_img Waitress When Luff is not on stage bringing a story to life, she is working with husband Matt Magnusson on their band called The Bones. “My husband and I are both actors, so we do have this storytelling background and we really try to use music as a form of storytelling when we write,” she said. “We actually have been commissioned to write a musical and we’re in the process of writing it at the moment.”With only a few weeks left as Jenna (Luff’s final performance is September 15), she is starting to look back on her journey to the diner. “Jenna has been such a gift and it’s been a dream role,” she said. “There are so many lessons she’s taught me like leaning into the imperfections of who you are, because her imperfections really shine. The line we always remember is, ‘She’s messy but she’s kind.’ Kindness will go a long way and things can get messy, but as long as you stay true—you’re going to stay on track.”See Luff in Waitress, playing at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre.Watch the full #LiveAtFive episode below! Star Files Alison Luff (Photos: Emilio Madrid-Kuser for Broadway.com)last_img read more

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Wells publishes his account of Bush v. Gore

first_img June 1, 2013 Jan Pudlow Senior Editor Regular News Wells publishes his account of Bush v. Gore Wells publishes his account of Bush v. Gore Senior EditorMuch has been written about the contested 2000 presidential election on the brink of a constitutional crisis, but now we hear from Charley Wells, the chief justice when the eyes of the world focused on the Florida Supreme Court. In his new book, Inside Bush v. Gore, Wells spends 136 pages reliving those tumultuous 36 days of protested and contested ballots ­— butterfly, hanging-chad, and undervoted — conflicting election statutes, and political posturing in a razor-thin margin of 537 votes for George W. Bush. He had the unique vantage point of a chief justice in uncharted waters in the perfect political and legal storm.We all know how this story ends.But Wells, now an attorney at GrayRobinson in Orlando, provides a fresh glimpse of what went on inside the tense conference room among the divided justices — and inside Wells’ own mind as he struggled to make legal sense of the fiasco and keep the judicial process moving.In front of the courthouse, right below the chief justice’s conference room, Wells could see carnival acts, including a pet skunk doing tricks to entertain the crowd, and a media tent city from 50 news organizations. When court spokesman Craig Waters appeared out the front door with updates, as Wells describes, it was “like the cuckoo coming out of the clock.”Inside the courthouse, everyone felt tremendous pressure of the real clock ticking toward the deadline of December 12, 2000, when both sides agreed the controversy had to be settled so that Florida’s voters would not lose control over the state’s electoral votes when the Electoral College met to vote for president on December 18.This deadline could not have been weightier.“In my view, lengthy uncertainty in this matter would be fraught with dangerous perils not only for Florida, but for the nation and the world,” Wells wrote.After Wells retired from the court in March 2009, his decision to write this book was “cemented.”“I had a particular perspective from the role that I was in at the time, so I would try to capture that,” Wells told the News. “I also agree with those commentators who say when you have the privilege of being part of an historical event — and in American history, the 2000 Florida election is an historical event — that you have some obligation to tell it. I was trying to give a feeling of what was happening and who the players were, as I saw it.”While Wells analyzes conflicting statutes, ancient case law, judicial philosophies, and court procedure, he has heard from “a number of nonlawyers who tell me they appreciated me trying to write it in nontechnical terms. I also hope it will be for law students and lawyers, so they can see how we worked on the case, and how we deliberated on the case, and how we processed it.”Wells refrained from assessing the discussions and decisions of his fellow justices because it would violate the ethics of his position on the court. But he was frank in assessing the personalities and politics of his colleagues, naming who he got along with and who he didn’t.“I felt compelled to be honest about my feelings,” Wells told the News. “There are seven members of the court, and every one of us has different personalities, and the inner workings of how we worked as a body had some bearing on what we thought the others were doing, philosophically.”In his book, Wells noted that five of the justices were “philosophically liberal,” all seven justices had been appointed by Democratic governors, and everyone except Major Harding was a registered Democrat.“Gore was the more liberal of the two candidates; therefore, it was my conclusion at the time that the leanings of the majority of the justices were in favor of Gore. Yet at this stage of the controversy, and actually through the end of the protest phase, I did not perceive that the decisions made by our court were the result of predisposed leanings in favor of Gore,” Wells wrote.But the partisan politics of both Secretary of State Katherine Harris and Attorney General Bob Butterworth worked against them, he noted.“Secretary of State Katherine Harris had been actively involved in Bush’s campaign, and Attorney General Bob Butterworth had been affiliated with the Gore campaign,” Wells wrote. “This made their objectivity suspect, and I did not believe the usual deferential weights should be given to their legal opinions regarding the election statutes. . . . Here the legal opinions of these top officials were in conflict and their opinions favored the candidate that each had backed in the election.”After oral argument on November 20, Wells wrote, “my impression from the comments by the other justices, both from their questions during the oral arguments and our two hours of post-oral argument discussions, was that they were for continuing the counting. How long we should allow the counting to continue would be the issue that could divide us.. . . I knew, however, that the lack of standards for manual counting of ballots was a crucial problem, and would be a recurring matter of contention.”While Wells struggled to shape his conclusion within his fundamental philosophy that “the court should adhere as closely as it reasonably could to what the Legislature had written in the statutes,” he could not see a way to do so because the statutes were a mess, so were the punch-card ballots, and there were no clear standards on how to count them.Several justices had strong views that the court should state that the “intent of the voter” was the Florida standard, but because that would boil down to the subjective opinion of the person doing the manual counting, they decided not to set standards.“The drafting of the opinion was unique in my experience, with the justices all sitting around the conference table preparing it,” Wells wrote. “For more than six hours, we collectively worked through the opinion word by word.”Wells describes that he was “generally pleased with the decision and the opinion. . . . We implemented a long-accepted principle in Florida election law that the rights of voters were to take precedence and be safeguarded, and we determined a date [5 p.m., November 26] that was fair to those voters whose votes had not been counted, while protecting the statutory right to further contest the election within a time period that would preserve Florida’s electoral votes.”“Frankly, I was somewhat taken aback by the vehemence with which the Bush supporters were attacking our court and the opinion. But that was the way it was,” Wells wrote.During the Thanksgiving holiday, Wells said he was “shocked” when he got word that the United States Supreme Court had granted Bush’s petition to review the Florida Supreme Court’s November 21 decision, and had set oral argument for December 1.Why would the high court get involved at this point, he wondered, when there was a strong likelihood Bush would be certified the winner on Sunday at 5 p.m. and the matter would be moot?“Moreover, there was the entire contest phase to go before any resolution of the controversy would be final,” Wells wrote. “I added the Supreme Court to the list of those about whom I wondered whether there was an understanding of Florida’s election laws.”Wells noted in an interview with the News that former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor recently told the Chicago Tribune editorial board that she had doubts it was a good idea for the high court to step in.“Maybe the court should have said, ‘We’re not going to take it. Goodbye,’” O’Connor is quoted as saying.In his book, Wells describes the frustrations of being a dissenter, in the aftermath of the court’s second December 8 decision. He was notified that a majority of Florida Supreme Court justices — Harry Lee Anstead, Barbara Pariente, Fred Lewis, and Peggy Quince —had agreed to reverse Second Circuit Judge Sanders Sauls’ decision not to count the contested ballots, and to hold that the Circuit Court of Leon County had authority to order all counties that had not conducted a manual recount of undervotes (ballots that did not record a vote for president) to do so.“I concluded that after all the counting was done, the margin of error was always going to be greater than the margin of victory,” Wells wrote.“I felt in all my being that what the majority was about to do was wrong. I wanted badly to find some way to find a fourth vote to obtain a different majority, affirm Judge Sauls, and end the case. Yet I knew that I was powerless to do this.“For the first time, in the days since the election, I was depressed, shaken, and actually fearful about what was to happen, and how the controversy would move forward. I wanted to go out to the steps of the Supreme Court building where Craig Waters reported the court’s actions and shout my fears, frustrations, and concerns. But, of course, I knew I could not do that.“My only course was to explain my deep-seated feelings as plainly as I could in a dissenting opinion. My hope had to be that I could explain the situation with sufficient clarity and alarm that the United States Supreme Court would again come into the case. I was no by means certain that would happen.”On December 12, Wells and his wife, Linda, went to a traveling Broadway show in Tallahassee, but left at intermission.“All of my thoughts were consumed by when the Supreme Court would rule,” Wells wrote.Shortly after arriving home, Wells heard a television report that the Supreme Court had reached a decision.When the network reporter first got the decision wrong and announced the case would be remanded to Florida, Wells wrote, “My heart pounded. Linda shouted: ‘Why would they do that?’“Like Linda, I had no idea what we could do upon remand. Blessedly, a few minutes later, the reporter corrected the remand report, and said that, by a vote of 5-4, the U.S. Supreme Court had reversed our court’s majority opinion.”The next day, shortly after 11 a.m., Gore announced he was going to concede.“There was basically silence in the hallways of our court,” Wells wrote. “I think that this evidenced the divisions that were apparent in the court’s December 8 opinion, and also evidence of relief that the controversy was over in our court.”As Wells has often remarked, he was proud that “the blocks of trucks parked for those 36 days across from our court had television transmitters on their roofs, not machine guns.”While strong feelings remain about what happened or should have happened, Wells concludes: “The ultimate role of courts is to resolve disputes. That is what the courts did accomplish in Bush v. Gore. . . . “I wrote in my dissent — and continue to believe as I write this book — that had the majority’s decision not been overturned by the United States Supreme Court, a constitutional crisis not previously seen in our nation’s history would have resulted.”( Inside Bush v. Gore may be purchased wherever books are sold or directly from University Press of Florida at www.upf.com. )last_img read more

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Intermissions with Double A; Monsters Top IceHogs 4-2

first_imgThe most untold event in sports is the in-arena entertainment during the intermissions. Part of the craziness is checking the concession stands hoping that it was dollar-dog at the far-end stand. Or wondering why a bag of Kit Kats cost $4. The joys of watching people waste their money on overpriced food. But also the stupidity of me paying the same price for that average hot dog that still makes you hungry afterwards.This is why the necessary action during intermissions take place inside the arena and at your seats. At the first intermission for the Lake Erie Monsters’ game versus the Rockford IceHogs (what a name), we hear the Valley Forge High School band try to make a mark for the fans. Then it was the two Zamboni going to work with the lucky kids waving as they how no fear falling off the machine. They are just happy to be on.But it was the second intermission that showed how entertainment can be forced and teased. The Monsters girls performed  for a very short 30 seconds! I was extremely disappointed because it looked like they were going to keep going. But the highlight of the intermissions was the “Trink” race (yes that was spelled correctly) which consisted of the Monsters worker forcing the bike to move so that the game can magically be close at the end.Since the game is on a Thursday night, it is naturally “College Night” with 80’s and 90’s music throwback at Quicken Loans Arena. So the contest I could relate was the “Flip Cup” contest where fans get to prove whether fans were drinking or studying in front of the home fans. It was truly a throwback to the times in college where I was in high pressured situations to perform in front of a crowd. Certainly, I never had to play with cameras in my face in front of 10,000 people with prizes on the line. But if I was drinking, I would think I was ready. Fortunately, the participants involved were sober.Intermissions are needed for valuable entertainment. It helps when the Monsters win games like this one over the IceHogs 4-2. The cool thing about intermission, it’s ran like Las Vegas. What happens in intermission…. Related TopicsDouble AintermissionLake Erie Monsters Anthony Alford is the Sports TV Media Beat Reporter as a avid Cleveland Sports fan. He covers media personalities and their performances are analyzed so that the viewing experience can increase for the sports fan alike. Alford brings his passion for Cleveland sports to NEO Sports Insiders. He currently does the daily morning and afternoon-drive shows on AllSportsCleveland.com.center_img Anthony Alfordlast_img read more

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