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Learn more from campus leadership at Staff Council forum Aug. 5

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: July 30, 2020 An open forum on the current state of campus, hosted by Staff Council with discussion by some of CU Boulder’s senior leadership, will be held via Zoom from 10 to 11 a.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 5. Patrick O’Rourke, interim executive vice chancellor and chief operating officer, and Katherine Erwin, chief human resources officer, will be panelists. Hannah Simonson, Staff Council vice chair, will moderate the discussion.The forum is designed to cover topics including the current state of campus and actions affecting personnel. A staff-focused question-and-answer session will also be part of the event, intended to help ensure that all staff members have access to the latest information on the upcoming semester. Registration is required and available online.Categories:Lectures & PresentationsEvents & Exhibitslast_img read more

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Adverse drug reactions rise sharply, study says

first_imgLOS ANGELES The number of serious adverse events and deaths attributed to prescription medications has nearly tripled since the Food and Drug Administration initiated a system in 1998 to make it easier to report significant side effects, researchers said today. “We have drugs out there we know how to manage, whose risks are well known, and for which we don’t have adequate programs in place to manage those risks,” he said. A quarter of the increase could be attributed to a boost in prescriptions and another 15% to the introduction of new biotechnology drugs since 1998, but the rest of the increase could not be explained, said drug safety expert Thomas J. Moore of the Institute for Safe Medication Practices in Huntingdon Valley, Pa. Moore and his colleagues analyzed all of the serious adverse-event drug reports submitted to the FDA through its Adverse Event Reporting System, commonly known as MedWatch reports. Physicians and the public submit reports to the FDA or to drug makers, which are then required to forward them to the FDA. Both Moore and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, or PhRMA, agreed that the FDA needed more funding to monitor drugs after they were introduced to the market. Such funds would allow the FDA to tap into electronic databases and other information technology systems and to develop novel approaches for monitoring drugs, said Ken Johnson, PhRMA’s senior vice president.The FDA’s office of surveillance and epidemiology also needs greater independence to upgrade drug warnings and mandate restrictions, Moore said. Currently, the office can only provide advice that may be acted on by other parts of the agency. From 1998 to 2005, the number of prescriptions written each year grew by 25%. The new system upgraded the FDA’s Spontaneous Reporting System to increase the efficiency with which the agency received, filed and analyzed the reports. “The clear finding is that we are losing ground in terms of drug safety, and that ought to be of great concern,” said Moore, who led the study. Women were involved in 55.5% of the events. A disproportionate share occurred among the elderly — a full third of events in a group that accounts for 12.6% of the population. Fewer events than expected occurred among children under age 18 — 7.4% in a group that represents 25% of the population. The number of such events grew from 34,966 in 1998 to 89,842 in 2005. During the same period, the number of deaths rose from 5,519 to 15,105. “There are clearly other factors responsible for this increase, such as the increase in public attention to drug safety and use of the Internet to make it easier for the public to … report adverse events to the FDA,” said Dr. Gerald Dal Pan, director of the FDA’s office of surveillance and epidemiology. Five of the top six drugs causing deaths were painkillers: Oxycontin, Fentanyl, morphine, acetaminophen and methadone. The sixth was the antipsychotic drug Clozapine. Both the FDA and a trade group representing drug makers agreed that the number of reported adverse events had been increasing, but they attributed much of the rise to an increase in voluntary reporting of the events. Studies have estimated that from as little as 3% of adverse events to a maximum of about 33% have been reported to the FDA. Among the drugs causing the most non-fatal adverse events were estrogens, insulin, interferon beta, Paroxetine, Clozapine, Oxycontin, warfarin and Fentanyl. Paroxetine is an antidepressant, interferon beta is used to treat multiple sclerosis and cancer, and warfarin is an anti-clotting agent. Moore said he was particularly disturbed by the appearance of drugs such as insulin and warfarin on the list. Adverse events are those defined as resulting in death, a birth defect, disability, hospitalization or requiring intervention to prevent harm. Twenty percent of drugs accounted for 87.1% of adverse effects, and the biggest offenders were painkillers and drugs that modify the immune system to treat arthritis, according to the report in the Archives of Internal Medicine.last_img read more

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Mayoral candidate O’Hara criticizes Overland Park Chamber’s support of continued use of public finance incentives for development

first_imgThe Prairiefire development in southern Overland Park was forced to scale back from plans that called for construction of the projects seen here after performing well under projections. The development benefited from STAR bonds.Charlotte O’Hara has made criticizing the widespread use of public finance incentives, like tax increment finance districts and sales tax revenue (STAR) bonds, a keystone of her campaign for Overland Park mayor.So when the Overland Park Chamber of Commerce presented a letter to the city council at a meeting last week voicing its continued support for “public/private investment,” it piqued O’Hara’s interest.In the letter, signed by chamber president Tracey Osborne and its board of directors, the group characterizes the use of public finance incentives as a significant driver of growth in the city.“Overland Park’s history of incentivizing, or more appropriately, investing in job creation and economic growth, is best described as forward-thinking, judicious and conservative,” read the letter. “This Council, and those preceding it, have applied the tools available to you on a careful and analytical basis.”The chamber points to companies like Black & Veatch, U.S. Bank and Zurich as having brought new jobs and property taxes to the area after benefitting from public finance incentives. But in recent years, the council’s approval of incentives for some developments has drawn scrutiny. The Prairiefire development in southern Overland Park, for instance, has performed well below projections, despite benefiting from STAR bond financing.O’Hara is among those who think Overland Park’s use of tax incentives has spun out of control.“A vast majority of these projects would go forward without public handouts,” she said. “Overland Park is a great city, it is not a blighted area where public money is needed to entice development…The free market works. My advice to the Chamber and the big corporations benefiting from government handouts: try it, you’ll like it!”In its statements in support of the continued use of incentives, the Chamber took on such criticisms.“While it’s politically popular to talk about ‘corporate welfare’ or ‘winners and losers,’ this investment, the way Overland Park applies it, has been a win-win all around,” Osborne said. “As the voice of business, we pledge our continued support and partnership in our mutual missions to create jobs and enhance our quality of life amenities. We encourage and endorse continued public investment in Overland Park’s infrastructure, public safety and economic development.”The Chamber’s full letter is embedded below:[gview file=”https://dfv6pkw99pxmo.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/15113534/Board-letter-to-City-Council.pdf”]last_img read more

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40South Energy Prepares to Launch Wave Energy Device in Pisa, Italy

first_img40South Energy will launch the first R115, which is a machine rated at 99kW, in Pisa on June 19th at a marina inside the “Darsena dei Navicelli”.After final assembly, most likely towards the end of July, the machine will be towed to the Punta Righini WEP (which is 40South’s test site) and stay there for a few months for commissioning and systems check.After the summer the company will retrieve the device, perform a thorough check (and possibly some adjustments) and then it will be ready for prime time in a grid connected installation. 40South Energy is in the consenting phase for the Elba WEP, and hopes that consenting for R115 will be in place in the fall. At this point property of this unit will pass to Enel Green Power, who has bought it back in 2012.If consenting at the Elba site will not be in place in time, the company will decide with EGP how to proceed. After this initial installation, and provided that updated consenting will be in place, 40South plans to upgrade this first R115/99kW to a full R115/150kW, and to add two more R115/150kW machines at the same site.[mappress]Press release, June 7, 2013; Image:40South Energylast_img read more

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Oligarch loses bid to keep freezing order secret

first_imgThe High Court has rejected an attempt by Russian billionaire Vitaly Orlov to keep secret a worldwide freezing order worth $350m (£266m) in the latest twist in a dispute over the ownership of a fisheries company being heard in London. The freezing order was obtained by Alexander Tugushev, a former business partner of Orlov, amid a long-running legal dispute to secure his one third interest in the Norebo Group. Orlov’s legal team had argued that Tugushev should not able to notify relevant third parties of the freezing order without Orlov’s consent or the permission of the court, saying this would amount to self-incrimination. However in Alexander Tugushev v Vitaly Orlov, Magnus Roth and Andrey Petrik, The Honourable Mr Justice Teare rejected Orlov’s proposed amendment of the order, which was granted by the High Court in July. Tugushev maintains that Orlov has sought to manoeuvre him out of his share in the Norebo Group of fishing companies, which among other activities supplies 20% of the cod eaten in Britain.Orlov has claimed privilege on the grounds of self-incrimination, citing a criminal investigation in Russia. He also plans to challenge the jurisdiction of the UK courts. Norebo Europe is a registered company in the UK.Tugushev said in a statement: ‘The High Court’s decision marks another positive step in my battle to regain the shares in the Norebo Group that were illegally taken from me. I will continue to fight for my interest in the company and right the wrongs perpetrated by my former business partner.’ A spokesperson for Orlov said: ‘To describe this as a significant legal victory is absurd. It was a hearing mainly to clarify an earlier judgment – which the judge recognised was open to interpretation. No costs award was made against Mr Orlov in respect of this clarification. The remainder of the hearing related to timetabling issues. Someone has attempted to dress up day-to-day administrative business of the courts with inaccurate and unjustified hyperbole. This hearing represented an early step in Mr Orlov’s challenge to the jurisdiction of the English courts and the continuation of the freezing order, challenges which he intends to pursue vigorously.’last_img read more

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